Author Topic: Mt Sandiman Williambury Road  (Read 1300 times)

Offline Howezit

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Mt Sandiman Williambury Road
« on: April 04, 2017, 07:04:06 PM »
Can anyone familiar with some of the roads in WA's Pilbara area help..?

Does anyone know whether a permit is required for the road
- From : Mount Sandiman (East of Kennedy Range National Park)
- To : Williambury (intersecting with junction of Lyndon Road)
travelling in NNW direction.
Some maps seem to indicate "Private Access".. others not...
Graham & Debbie Howe
Driving : Nissan Patrol 4.2 TDi
Towing : Tvan Tanami Mk4

Offline peter_mcc

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Re: Mt Sandiman Williambury Road
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2017, 07:12:41 PM »
I'm not sure but I'm interested...

We're hoping to camp on the Eastern side of the Kennedy Range then head north to near Mt Sandiman then west across the Kennedy Range NP to Binthalya then out to the coast. There is a 4wd track across the middle of the park. Does anyone know what condition it is in? What about the road out via Mardathuna?

Offline rark

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Mt Sandiman Williambury Road
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2017, 10:25:30 AM »
We travelled that road (Mt Sandiman to Williambury) last October. It's just a station road that was in reasonably good condition. From memory the road was an adjunct route to Wool Wagon Pathway or Kingsford-Smith Mail Route trail (we weren't doing either trail but the signs are well maintained through that area). We'd popped down to Kennedy Range NP then back to Mt Sandiman and via Cobra Station to Mt Augustus.

We hiked the gorges at Kennedy Range but didn't take any 4WD tracks across the top. The road to Gascoyne Junction was apparently in good order (according to fellow travelers) and then its bitumen into Carnarvon.

Offline Frankrhona

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Re: Mt Sandiman Williambury Road
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2017, 07:50:17 PM »
Ronny Dahl has some awesome YouTube videos of 4WD'ing in WA including the Kennedy Ranges. Filmed with GoPro's and a drone he is one of the best 4WD video makers I have seen. Worth a look. It maybe worth contacting him for info, url attached.
http://www.4-wheeling-in-western-australia.com/
It looks like awesome country on Google Earth! Envy.
Cheers, Andrew
Andrew & Clare
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Offline peter_mcc

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Re: Mt Sandiman Williambury Road
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2017, 04:34:14 PM »
We went across the Kennedy Range from west-east in late May. We crossed the Gasgoyne River at the bottom then camped at Chaffcutters Spring. Then further along that side of the range before heading up and over, camping again at the top of the cliffs on the eastern side. We then followed it down to the main road and took at look at the normal visiting spots before heading back to Carnarvon.

The Gasgoyne River crossing was painful - there is 300+m of really soft sand before you get to the river itself and we got stuck about 50m in (I thought I'd chance it without letting tyres down - as soon as we slowed down I stopped realising it wasn't going to work). We spent ages with MaxTrax and letting tyres down, moving another 50m,  before I realised the "Kwiky" tyre deflator pressure gauge (from 4wd Supacentre) is essentially worthless. I thought I had 18psi in the tyres but it was really more like 30... After letting them down to 15psi we got moving again and made it across to the "water". Back then it was just a trickle - I'm sure it would be dry now. There is a "rocky" crossing about 300m upstream - we took that because it had a firm base and I didn't relish the idea of getting stuck in the water!

After that it's a reasonable road most of the time up the western side. There are rocky sections, there are smooth sections. Nothing difficult.

Chaffcutter Springs was lovely - there was some water (not to swim/drink in), lots of gum trees and lovely red rocks. Great for sunset/sunrise. We explored the hills around a bit - if you climb the one to the north there are some wire sculpture figures up there!!

The road up the range was a bit washed out but nothing too hard - it's quite bumpy/rocky so we took it slow. The road across the top is in good condition EXCEPT that it isn't very wide - we were hitting vegetation on both sides all the time. It broke off our Tvan radio antenna. Thankfully our side awning is mounted in from the edge - I'm not sure how one mounted on the side would go.

At one point you come close to a big canyon to the south - we stopped there and walked over (500m or so) - nice views. Make sure you can find your way back to the car though.

Then you come out at the eastern cliffs. I'd recommend camping fairly soon after you get to the cliffs - they are higher there. We went almost all the way to the north and they weren't as high/spectactular. The Tvan is perfectly suited for camping there - the ground is covered in rocks. I'm not sure how you'd go in a soft floor camper, tent or swag.

We went just past the turnoff down the range to the old homestead ruins - worth a look. If you go there make sure you walk up to the old water tank then down the hill to the east - you can find the old well. Beware - it's open and has water in the bottom so take care with kids! I'm not sure how deep it is - I was by myself and wasn't game to get too close in case I slipped in and nobody knew where I was. To the east of the homestead there is also their "dump" with some old tractor/car/windmill parts to look at.

The road down to the east is easy to follow and a bit scratchy again. Then it's out to the main road and away you go!